The Théâtre des Champs-Élysées and Alpha continue their series of recordings of the Mozart operas conducted by Jérémie Rhorer. After Die Entführung aus dem Serail, which received excellent international reviews (including FFFF in Télérama), here now is La clemenza di Tito. One of Mozart’s most accomplished operas, it is set to a (revised) libretto by Metastasio that stands in the line of descent from two masterpieces of French Classical drama, Corneille’s Cinna and Racine’s Bérénice.
From the former, it borrows the themes of the solitude of power; from the latter, the heartbreak of choice for lovers. When the curtain rose on his production at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in December 2014, Denis Podalydès showed Racine’s Bérénice proclaiming her final resolve to leave Rome. The nobility and spiritual elevation of this farewell speech set the psychological and moral tone of the opera. It challenges all the characters to surpass themselves and grow in stature.

In the press

‘Divinatory conducting, a cast close to the ideal . . . The last opera Mozart composed, long undervalued, closes the chapter of the Baroque and looks into the future, blazing a new trail that announces the nineteenth century.’ Gilles Macassar / Télérama, 2014 This outstanding interpretation is now available in a two-CD set, featuring a high-powered cast.

LA CLEMENZA DI TITO / MOZART

February 11, 2017
Théâtre des Champs-Elysées & Alpha Classics
Live Recording

The Théâtre des Champs-Élysées and Alpha continue their series of recordings of the Mozart operas conducted by Jérémie Rhorer. After Die Entführung aus dem Serail, which received excellent international reviews (including FFFF in Télérama), here now is La clemenza di Tito. One of Mozart’s most accomplished operas, it is set to a (revised) libretto by Metastasio that stands in the line of descent from two masterpieces of French Classical drama, Corneille’s Cinna and Racine’s Bérénice.
From the former, it borrows the themes of the solitude of power; from the latter, the heartbreak of choice for lovers. When the curtain rose on his production at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in December 2014, Denis Podalydès showed Racine’s Bérénice proclaiming her final resolve to leave Rome. The nobility and spiritual elevation of this farewell speech set the psychological and moral tone of the opera. It challenges all the characters to surpass themselves and grow in stature.

In the press

‘Divinatory conducting, a cast close to the ideal . . . The last opera Mozart composed, long undervalued, closes the chapter of the Baroque and looks into the future, blazing a new trail that announces the nineteenth century.’ Gilles Macassar / Télérama, 2014 This outstanding interpretation is now available in a two-CD set, featuring a high-powered cast.